PROGRAM INFORMATION


I.      INTRODUCTION -BACKGROUND & HISTORY

II.     OBJECTIVES -PROGRAM STRUCTURE

III.    TRAINING & RECRUITMENT

IV.    INMATES ELIGIBILITY & FOLLOW UP

V.     OUTREACH CLIENTS & GOAL

VI.    DIRECTIONS TO M.C.I. NORFOLK

VII.  VISITOR ENTRY PROCEDURES

VIII. DRESS CODE -MALE & FEMALE -YOUTHS

VISITOR & YOUTHS CONDUCT.
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INTRODUCTION

    The delivery of counseling and educational services to youth by inmate coordinated programs throughout the Massachusetts Correctional System has proven to be highly successful. Outreach programs currently exist at MCI-Norfolk, Bay State Correctional Institution and several coUnty houses of correction. The proliferation of these programs reflects both a heightened concern about delinquent crime and a broad consensus that inmate counseling does help to deter youth from crime.
Although no systematic objective evaluation of the effectiveness of such p~ograms has been undertaken, there is ample and growing support within the community to suggest that they are effecting positive changes. The thousands of young men who annually participate represents a testament to the need and belief in these programs. The confidence expressed by O.Y.S. staff and administrators; and other social service agencies has been willing, but eager to contract the services of inmate counseling, groups.

BACKGROUND AND HISTORY

    The concept of prison based juvenile counseling programs in Massachusetts originated at MCI-Walpole in 1973. Reach Out became the test case and forerunner for all future efforts. Its success led to the adoption of various models for counseling/education both delinquent and pre-delinquent youth through the correctional system.
 
    The most comprehensive and challenging program is operating at- MCI-Norfolk. Second Thoughts has gained wide support and commendation From OYS officials. Positive publicity in several newspapers has reflected favorably both on the program as well as the institution.

    In 1980, a proposal was accepted for Project Revamp to provide counseling services to delinquent youth. Project Revamp is the parent associate of Second Thoughts. The transition from Project Revamp to Second Thoughts was, however, more than an expansion and a consonant with Project Revamp, there has been an evolution in the strategy and approach to counsellng. There has been a movement in the direction of establ ishing a longer-term contract between the juvenile center and the program. The ,'
value of an extended committment period is to strive to transcend the primary focus of educational experiences to therapeutic
relationships.

    Second Thoughts continues to advocate the benefit of informing the youth of the realities of crime but feels an equally compelling urgency to fulfill the real need for teenagers to be able to talk with someone who can relate and understand what they are experiencing. For counseling to be a meaningful and effective, a trusting relationship must be established and this requires more than a few random visits.

    Thus the orientation for Second Thoughts is for a more comprehensive and in depth approach. Accordingly, the training is more extensive and challenging. A diverse array of agencies and resources are utilized during the training cycles in an effort to broaden the skills of the counselors.

    In the past several years, Second Thoughts has counseled hundreds of youths from the juvenile facilities affiliated with the Department of Youth Services. Second Thoughts is currently providing counseling services to the Judge J. Connolley Youth Center, Westboro Secure Treatment, C.H.O Central Treatment(Westboro) , City Year, and many other "at risk" youth programs.

OBJECTIVES


A. To provide counseling services to delinquent youths conined to D.Y.S. facilities.

B. To provide a public service to the community by using an inmate population as agents for change in deterring delinquent youths from crime.

C. To provide a positive and constructive activity at MCI-NorFolk. There is definite rehabilitative value in such programs. It is logical and tenable to assert that inmates gain therapeutically both from working through their personal problems during training sessions, and from working with youths directly.
 
D. To promote improved relations with the community. A valuable opportunity exists to enhance the image of inmates as well as the institution by giving something back to the community.

PROGRAM STRUCTURE


    The administration of the program shall be conducted by a board of directors elected by a majority vote. Only the directors shall elect and vote new members to the board of directors.

TRAINING

    The decision to hold a training cycle is determined by the Second Thoughts Board of Directors. During and annual period, as many as three training cycles may be held depending on the need to recruit new members. In addition, the training periods provide as opportunity for review and new learning experiences for all members of the program.
 
    A training cycle may extend from sixteen to twenty weeks and is comprised of three separate components.

1) We often schedule guest speakers to give a presentation of a specific counseling topic. The topics are logically developed from the most fundamental introductory issues to more complicated counseling themes. The guest speakers are enlisted from mental health personnel within the prison: Sexual Offender's Treatment Counselor; Drugs & Alcohol; as well as the Psychological Services branch of the Department Corrections.

2) Training in group therapy supplements the weekly counseling presentation. This is an independent training component with an emphasis placed on developmental stages and the specific tasks required of group facilitators. The goal is to acquire an understanding of group dynamics.

3) A separate time period is allotted for role plays. These exercises in psychodrama are important to allow trainees to apply and experience the theoretical knowledge.

    All counseling education conforms to a well defined training philosophy. Second Thoughts training is designed to familiarize the trainees with Fundamental counseling concepts. It is intended to provide the counselors with insights and practical applications of psychological knowledge. At the same time, a deliberate effort is made not to engage in extensive theoretical abstractions of physchological concepts. It is an approach which is decidely eclectic and basic. Above all, the goal is to develop a disciplined approach to counseling with a genuine concern for developing healthy relationships. We, inmate counselors are not professionals, but it is important to recognize both the opportunities and limitations inherent in such a therapeutic mode. The training should instill honest and realistic expectations about what we can accomplish in counseling.

    The greatest asset inmate counselors; possess is their life experiences which are unique. As incarcerated offenders, we have a set of experiences which enable us to establish a rapport with incarcerated youths at D.Y.S. facilities that is not accessible to professional  therapists. Thus, our strengths as well as our limitations are explored in an effort to further define our role as  counselors.

RECRUITMENT


    Recruitment and selection is critical to the effectiveness of the program. It is essential therefore, to screen men on the basis of maturity, responsibility, and attitude. Although this criteria may seem to be somewhat subjective and problematic, it has proven to be more reliable than applying impersonal application methods.

ELIGIBILITY

    Inmates applying to participate in the program are given an intensive questionnaire. Each applicant is required to complete the questionnaire and meet with the board members individually to review it. It is an opportunity For the board members and the applicants to become better acquainted and share their views and expectations for participation. During this meeting a copy of the rules and regulations are reviewed with the applicants to clarify any misunderstandings. The board members ask that each applicant make a minimum one year commitment. The program invests a substantial amount of time and energy toward training each new member. In essence, this is a forum to communicate to all prospective members that counseling is difficult to work requiring a sincere commitment.

    After initial screening, the names are submitted to the Director of Treatment and the Inner Perimeter Security. The Administration will screen both the criminal and institutional record of the applicants based on an established criteria. As a juvenile counseling program, Massachusetts Law prohibits participation by men who have I been convicted of sexual offenses.

WEEKLY SUPERVISION

    At the close of each week, the group meets to review the counseling session. It is a valuable opportunity for constructive feedback, assistance, and supervision. Each counselor ofFers his insights on the group therapy sessions and may request assistance or quidelines in his individual counseling with his client. this "Follow-up" period affords the counselors with an opportunity to enlarge and enhance their understanding of the clients as well as each other. It facilitates greater cohesion and unity within the group. Also, it serves as a focal point and sense of direction for forthcoming sessions. This is a process of  ongoing training.

    The community advisors play an active role in these sessions by providing a professional perspective and supervision. In addition, clinical staff from the participating juvenile centers may be periodically invited to attend. Their observations are welcome and necessary if we are to coordinate our counseling with their treatment" model.

COUNSELING FORMAT

     The counseling sessions last for two and one half hours. We deal with issues regarding: drug and alcohol abuse, peer pressure, violent behavior, and family; relationships. The group sessions may be highly structured, but a therapeutic model encouraging free flowing interaction is the ideal. There is usually a fifteen minute break in between for refreshments.

OUTREACH CLIENTS 

    The primary source of clients for the program is the Department of Youth Services. Paralleling the overcrowding within the adult correctional system, D.Y.S. is confronted witH the challenge of providing treatment services to a growing population. The high rate of recidivism among youth offfenders is a priority for D.Y.S. and a concern for everyone. They have' increasingly engaged community based programs is an effort to broaden their resources and involve the public.

    O.Y.S. has eagerly availed themselves to inmate counseling programs. The sentiment within the Department of Youth Services is that, "it is very valuable to the treatment process, as it relates to helping to combat the high recidivism rate that is evidenced throughout the system. "

    Transportation arrangements are the responsibility of the participating facilities. Although transportation has posed an instrumental problem for some facilities, most D.Y.S. institutions have been willing and able to commit the necessary staff personnel to meet the security procedures for transporting youths.

OUR GOAL?

    As we have already .ade "bad choices" in life, we will strive to give the kids "Second Thoughts" about leading a life of crime!

 

DIRECTIONS TO MCI-NORFOLK

From Boston: Take Route 93 South/Southeast Expressway to the Braintree split at Route 3, Take Routes 128/93 to Route 95 South, Take Route 1 South/Wrentham exit. Follow past Foxboro Stadium to the third set of traffic lights (Lafayette House Restaurant on right). Turn right onto Pine Street. At the stop sign, turn right. Pine Street joins Route 115. At the first set of traffic lights, turn right onto Route 1A North. Go past Caritas Southwood Hospital and up a steep hill past MCI-Cedar junction at the top. Take the first left onto Winter Street. Continue on Winter Street for approximately 1/2 mile. MCI-Norfolk is the 2nd prison on the left.

From North: Take Route 495 South to exit 15A (Route 1A North/Wrentham). Go approximately 9 miles and through 2 sets of traffic lights. Go past Caritas Southwood Hospital and up a steep hill past MCI-Cedar junction at the top. Take first left onto Winter Street. Continue on Winter Street for approximately 1/2 mile. MCI-Norfolk is the 2nd prison on the left
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From South: Take Route 495 North to exit 14A (Route 1 North). Follow Route 1 North past the Foxboro State Police barracks to the first set of traffic lights (Lafayette House Restaurant on left). Turn left onto Pine Street. At the stop sign, turn right. Pine Street joins Route 115. At the first set of traffic lights, turn right onto Route 1 A North. Go past Caritas
Southwood Hospital and up a steep hill pas MCI-Cedar junction at the top. Take the first left onto Winter Street. Continue on Winter Street for approximately 1/2 mile. MCI-Norfolk is the 2nd prison on the left.

From East: Take Route 140 West to the center ofWrentham. Take a right at the set of traffic lights onto Route 1 A North. Go past Caritas Southwood Hospital and up a steep hill past MCI-Cedar junction at the top. Take the first left onto Winter Street. Continue on Winter Street for .approximately 1/2 mile. MCI-Norfolk is the 2nd prison on the left.

From West: Take the Massachusetts Turnpike to Route 495 South to exit 15A (Route 1A North/Wrentham). Go approximately 9 mi1es and through 2 sets of traffic lights. Go past Caritas Southwood Hospital and up a steep hill past MCI-Cedar junction at the top. Take the first left onto Winter Street. Continue on Winter Street for approximately 1/2 mile. MCI-Norfolk is the 2nd prison on the left.


VISITOR ENTRANCE  PROCEEDURE

THE ONLY ITEMS  THAT YOU WILL BE ALLOWED TO BRING INTO THE INSTITUTION ARE:

A .LOCKER KEY

B. LIFE SAVING MEDICATIONS

C. MATERIAL RELATED TO PROGRAM (W/APPROVAL)

(All STAFF MUST ENSURE  THAT THE YOUTHS HAVE  "NOTHING" ON THEIR PERSON THAT WILL  
JEOPADIZE THEMSELVES OR THE PROGRAM. PLEASE HAVE THEM RE-CHECK THEIR POCKETS
PRIOR TO ENTERING THE PRISON [I.E. GUM, CANDY, WRAPPERS, PAPER, ETC.] )

IF ANY VISOTOR IS FOUND WITH ANYTHING IN THEIR POCKETS, ONCE THEY ENTER THE
TRAP, THEY WILL BE REFUSED ENTRY INTO THE PRISON

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Upon entering the trap you will be asked to remove your belt, shoes, outer wear (i.e. coats, sweaters & multiple shirts). These items will be searched by one of the trap oFFicers.

The search of the day: This search is selected by the Shift Commander and is run for 24 hrs. For instance, if the search of the day is "pat search every fourth person" then every fourth person who passes through the trap, will be subject to that search.

DRESS CODE:

GENERAL RULES

1. Footwear must be worn by all visitors.

2. No jewelry, other than traditional wedding ring and/or traditional engagement ring (i.e. diamond-left ring finger), medical alert bracelet/necklace, one (1) religious medal (necklace type only).

3. Clothing that is ripped, torn or with holes is not allowed.

4. Bobby pins, curlers, hair clips, hair scrunches, headbands, and detachable shoulder pads are not allowed to be worn by visitors into the institution.

5. Gloves and scarves are not allowed to be worn by visitors into the institution.

6. Any type of appliance, brace, ace bandage, cast, dressing, must be removable For thorough search and/or visibly searchable.
7. At the discretion of the Shift Commander or his/her designee, any article of  clothing worn by the visitor, displaying obscene, racial, sexual, or any other offensive statement, pictures, caricatures, or symbols and gang affiliation, will not be allowed.

8. Sweatpants or jogging suits with an elastic waistband is not allowed regardless of material. Maternity clothes worn by pregnant women will be allowed.

9. All visitors must have shirts tucked in. At no time will visitors or inmates be allowed to wear shirts that are untucked while in the visiting room.

10. All hairpieces must be searched.

11. Farmer jeans and bib-coveralls are not allowed.

12. All visitors are required to wear appropriate and/or traditional undergarments.

13. No bathing suits or shorts (All) including culottes.

14. No double layered clothing on the lower half of the person.

 
"ADULT" MALE VISITORS:

1. No blue, black, or gray denim dungarees, jeans, coats, vests, or jackets.

2. No fatigue or camouflage clothing.

3. No tank tops, muscle shirts (unless worn as an undergarment "T-shirt").

4. No shorts allowed

5. No clothing similar to that issued to uniformed personnel.

",JUVENILE" MALE VISITORS:

All above restrictions shall apply to juvenile male visitors also, except #1 (regarding jeans) The youths are allowed to wear jeans and/or DYS issued clothing, into the institution.
 

FEMALE VISITORS:

1. No tights, leotards, body suits of dance/exercise Fashion, halter or tank tops (unless an undergarment), or clothing that reveals the midrift, or expose the back beyond the upper shoulder area.

2. No low cut or excessively revealing clothing.

3. Dresses or skirts are not allowed to exceed (4) inches above the knees to include skirts with slit extending four (4) inches above the knee.

4. No nylons, pantyhose, or underwear with holes in the crotch area.

IT IS A FELONY IN MASSACHUSETTS FOR ANY PERSON TO DELIVER ANY ARTICLE WHATSOEVER TO AN INMATE WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OR COMMISSIONER (OR TO PROCURE AN ARTICLE TO BE DELIVERED, TO POSSESS IT WITH INTENT TO DELIVER IT OR TO DEPOSIT OR CONCEAL IT WITH INTENT THAT AN INMATE SHALL OBTAIN IT).

UPON ENTERING, VISITORS MUST DISCLOSE TO THE ADMITTING OR SEARCHING OFFICER(S) ANY ARTICLE THEY ARE CARRYING ON THEIR PERSON EXCEPT THE CLOTHES THAT THEY ARE WEARING. ANYONE WHO ATTEMPTS TO CARRY IN OR OUT OF THE INSTITUTION ANY ARTICLE WITHOUT THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ADMITTING OR SEARCHING OFFICER(S) (I.E. WEAPONS, CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES, OR ALCOHOL) SHALL BE LIABLE TO ARREST AND LOSS OF VISITING PRIVILEGES.

THIS PROVISION IS POSTED IN ENGLISH AND SPANISH IN THE LOBBY OF THE INSTITUTION.

CONDUCT OF VISITORS (ESPECIALLY THE YOUTHS):

Visitors shall be expected to dress and conduct themselves reasonably and not to engage in physical contact with inmates that is excessive or inappropriate for a public plaCe.
 
DYS STAFF IS RESPONSOBLE FR ENSURING THAT THE YOUTHS ARE IN COMPLIANCE TO THE INST'ITUTIONAL RULES:

1. No horse playing
 
2. No disrespecting the officers

3. No talking back to officers
 
4. No disrespecting inmates visits coming in

5. Having nothing in their pockets or on their person upon entry

A VIOLATION OF ANY OF THE ABOVE WILL JEOPARDlZE THE FACILITY (OR YOUTH) FROM COMING BACK TO THE INSTITUTION
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IN ADDITION, ANYTHING ACTION THAT BRINGS NEGATlVE LIGHT TO THE PROGRAM, CAN/WILL LEAD TO THE DEMISE OF THE SECOND THOUGHTS PROGRAM .

FEMALE VISITORS
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FEMALES ARE NOT ALLOWED TO MAKE PHYSlCAL CONTACT WITH ANY INMATE ( I.E. HUGS OR KISSES), OTHER THAN A NORMAL HANDSHAKE.
 
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING THE PRISON RULES AND REGULATIONS, PLEASE CONTACT THE DIRECTOR OF TREATMENT @ 781-668-0800 x 254; OR YOU, MAY CONTACT THE PROGRAM COORDINATOR AT THE ADDRESS ON THE LETTERHEAD
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WE THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION AND ADHERENCE TO THE INSTITUTIONAL RULES.

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